The Buzz Blog

Welcome to our blog 'The Buzz'.  Here we will keep you updated on what is happening in the world of bees and honey and anything else that we think you would be interested in.  If there is a topic you would like to hear about drop us an email and I'll see what we can do.


Sustainable Me April Challenge

Written by Stephanie on April 1st, 2021.      0 comments

A new month, a new challenge with 'OSOF (Our Seas Our Future) Sustainable Me Challenge'. Each month this year we will be challenged to test out an environmentally friendly behaviour that in some way impacts ocean health. It gives us the challenge to try something new for the month and decide if we want to adopt it more in our lives.

This month's challenge takes place in our kitchens, to preserve some fresh, local produce for the depths of winter.  What a great idea!  Not only are you saving on packaging you're ensuring there's no wastage.  And what a great way to reuse your Sweetree honey jars!

 

Here's What They Suggest:

Beginner: Just freeze something. This is the easiest way to preserve fresh foods. Make a basic freezer jam, or simply slice up some plums and pears and stash them away for a winter’s morning.

Intermediate: Get preserving! Try out some pickles or jam through the links provided above and below.  Use your Sweetree honey jars!

Advanced: Go crazy in the kitchen with jams, chutneys, sauces, kimchi and soups. How much can you preserve?


This challenge works in perfectly with Sweetree's 'Bee Sweet and Reuse' photo competition!  Email us or share a photo on our Facebook page or Instagram page of glass jars (not just Sweetree jars) being used creatively and you could be in to win!  Show us your storage ideas, preserves, anything and be in to win a spot prize of plastic free goodies!
 

Read more about the Sustainable Me Challenge and Why We Love It

 

Read more on the Sustainable Me website


Preserves
 
 

'Bee Sweet and Reuse' Photo Competition!

Written by Stephanie on April 1st, 2021.      0 comments

When we were deciding how to package our honey it had to be glass.  It is so much more healthier, attractive and environmental friendly.  I came across this on Glass for Life facebook page which sums it up quite well - "People trust glass more than any other packaging material to protect the flavor and freshness of their food and drink. And for good reason. Glass is safe and healthy, pure and virtually inert. It’s made of natural ingredients—sand, limestone and soda ash. Glass is 100% recyclable and highly sustainable— unlike most other packaging materials, it can be recycled over and over. And glass says quality without even trying. Glass is life, for all the right reasons."

Lots of our customers reuse our honey jars for jams, chutneys, sauces and for storing items.  Any jars we get back we make jam and give back to our local food bank.  My pantry is full of glass jars for nuts, seeds, lentils, etc.  What do you use empty glass jars for?
 

Competition Time!


We would love to see what people do with used glass jars so we have decided to run our photo competition again.  Email us or share a photo on our Facebook page or Instagram page of glass jars (not just Sweetree jars) being used creatively and you could be in to win!  Show us your storage ideas, preserves, anything and be in to win a spot prize of plastic free goodies!

Here's some ideas from our photographer, Claudia Aalderink who owns The Mandarin Tree art and concept store in Gordonton. There are more ideas on our Pinterest page and some coming on our Facebook page over the the next month or so.
 
bead-in-jar                pumice-in-jar
 
Bee-Sweetree-Reuse-Keepsakes  Bee-Sweetree-Reuse-Pencils

 
 

Sustainable Me March Challenge

Written by Stephanie on March 1st, 2021.      0 comments

With the 'OSOF (Our Seas Our Future) Sustainable Me Challenge' each month we are challenged to test out an environmentally friendly behaviour that in some way impacts ocean health.  This month's challenge takes place in our bathrooms, to reduce our personal care product footprint. The idea it to avoid microplastic and other chemicals in personal products.
 

Here's What They Suggest:


Beginner:
Become an informed consumer. Read the back of your shampoo bottle and other personal care projects. Look for and learn about the chemicals listed above in their various forms. When it’s time to purchase more, choose a brand that is microplastic, paraben, phthalate, formaldehyde and palm oil free. 

Intermediate:
Extend your scrutiny to other bathroom products including ensuring that all your cleaning products are eco-friendly. Lemon, baking soda and vinegar are great as cleaning products – both good for the environment and your wallet! You might also look at your choice of toilet paper and choose a 100% recycled brand.

Advanced:
Go cosmetics free! There are lots of ways to eliminate commercial personal care products from your life. Try washing your hair with baking soda and conditioning with vinegar. Do some research, get creative!

Check out inspirational local websites such as Wendyl's

Read more about the Sustainable Me Challenge and Why We Love It

 

Read more on the Sustainable Me website


This article is included in Twinkl's Eco-Friendly and Sustainability campaign, and is part of their article Some great ideas to be more sustainable in 2021
 
Glass-skincare

 

 

OSOF Sustainable Me Challenge!

Written by Stephanie on January 1st, 2021.      2 comments

You will have probably guessed by now, by reading previous posts, that we are passionate about sustaining our earth for future generations. Martin's full time job is actually in energy management, helping large businesses reduce their energy consumption, looking at alternative energy uses and reducing their carbon footprint. At home and in our honey business we have substantially reduced what we send to the landfill, we avoid over packaging, try to avoid one use plastic, buy bulk, reuse or recycle as much as we can and purchase locally as much as possible. 

All Sweetree honeys are packaged in glass jars, our propolis in glass bottles, our bee pollen is available in glass jars and we have always used paper bags instead of plastic at the markets. We still have lots of work to do but we are getting better!

I believe that if everyone just starts somewhere and does a little bit (e.g. saying no to a straw) it will make a big difference to the future of our earth. It can be really hard to take on new behaviours and even harder with our busy lifestyles these days. I found it easier to start by following a few organised challenges like 'Plastic Free July' and 'Recycle Week', I just started out small and now many of those behaviours that I found hard are now automatic.

 

A Great Challenge!


'OSOF (Our Seas Our Future) Sustainable Me Challenge' is a great way to start! Each month this year we will be challenged to test out an environmentally friendly behaviour that in some way impacts ocean health. It gives us the challenge to try something new for the month and decide if we want to adopt it more in our lives.

OSOF say "Give it a go for one month and see if you like it. If it’s something you can get on board with, great! Adopt it as part of your regular routine. If it’s a behavior that doesn’t work for you, that’s ok. After 12 months and 12 activities, you just might have a few new actions to add to your sustainability portfolio. If possible, rope a couple of friends or family members into participating with you. The more support you have, the more likely you are to keep up with the behaviours for a full month – enough time to decide whether or not it’s something you can take up for the long term."

Good luck and have fun! Let us know how you get on!
 

Check Out the Monthly Challenges so Far:


This article is included in Twinkl's Eco-Friendly and Sustainability campaign, and is part of their article Some great ideas to be more sustainable in 2021

 

OSOF-Branded-167-302-563

 

Embrace Nature this Conservation Week

Written by Stephanie on August 13th, 2020.      0 comments

See nature through new eyes this Conservation Week, 15-23 August 2020. Conservation week is a great opportunity to immerse ourselves in nature and embrace what's always been there; look, listen, breathe and feel.
Since the COVID-19 lockdown, many of us slowed down and looked at our lives and the world differently. So, the Department of Conservation is inviting us to enjoy a fresh perspective on our natural spaces and unique wildlife and boost your wellbeing by immersing ourselves in nature.
 

Nature needs us

New Zealand’s wildlife is still in crisis with more than 4,000 of our native animals and plants threatened or at risk. Conservation Week is a chance to bring everyone together to do something, big or small to create change.
Every year Conservation Week sees thousands of New Zealanders getting involved through doing conservation activities at home or attending one of many events hosted across the country. Creating change can be big or small, when we pull together, we can make a big difference. Check out DOCs website.
 

History of Conservation Week

Did you know that Conservation Week was originally launched in 1969 by the New Zealand Scout Association?  With the goal to promote greater interest in the environment and encourage people to take practical actions to look after it. Awesome!
 
Conservatin-Week
 

Beehive Boxes Repurposed into Beautiful Art!

Written by Stephanie on August 7th, 2020.      0 comments

Nothing goes to waste here!  Even our old beehive boxes get a new lease of life by local artist Claudia Aalderink.  Claudia takes rustic, weathered, and colourful beehive boxes, along with found materials such as wine barrel rings, pallet straps, and anything usable and transforms them into unique and one of a kind pieces of art.  I've never met anyone who can take a basic discarded item and create such beauty like this before.

We love that the materials that could have ended up in the fire pile or landfill, are repurposed, recycled and reused in such an artistic and functional way.  Thanks so much Claudia for your inspiration!

Check out Claudia's latest piece below, you can see Martin likes to write little notes on the outside of the boxes eg 'Ohui'. 
 
Claudia takes commissions for any size work, check out Claudia's websitelike on Facebook and/or follow on Instagram.

Find out more about Ohui
Beehive-Art-Ohui-548
 

Plastic Free July: Reducing Packaging

Written by Stephanie on July 4th, 2020.      0 comments


Monthly-PlasticThe photo to the right was a display at the Waikato Museum that shows how much packaging the average New Zealand family sends to the landfill every month.  Startling isn't it! Do you think your family uses this much packaging monthly?  I think if you held onto your plastics for a month you would be surprised how much you used!

You can just imagine what this is doing to the environment with everyone adding their bit to the landfill each month.  If we all did a little something to reduce the amount of packaging we use it will all help! 
 

Tips for Reducing Packaging in Our Homes:

  • Grow your own veges and fruit
  • Buy fresh, loose food rather than pre-packaged food, you can make or buy little cloth bags to put loose fruit or veges into
  • Say no to the bags that shops give to carry your goods, see Limit Plastic Bag Use, and take your own cloth bags instead.
  • Choose items in glass, paper, cardboard, etc as opposed to plastic
  • Buy nuts, dried fruit, flour, legumes, coffee, rice, oats, etc from bulk bins using cloth bin bags (check out your local Bin Inn Store)
  • Consider buying commonly used items like flour and rice in bulk and share with friends (bags are usually paper)
  • Avoid over packaged products, go for products with the least plastic packaging
  • Go for reusable options where you can, eg refilling containers, refillable toner cartridges, etc
  • Purchase from a Farmers Market or farm shop and take your own cloth bags
  • Store food in the fridge in a non-plastic container, in a bowl with a plate on the top or cover or wrap them in HoneyWraps or you make your own bowl covers
  • Make or buy fresh bread from the bakery and pop into a cloth bag, you can make your own
  • Wrap cheese in an old linen towel or HoneyWrap
  • Learn the art of furoshiki gift wrapping, it's fun!
  • Use reusable lunch boxes and wrap in HoneyWraps rather than plastic food wrap for lunches and snacks
  • Use newspaper to line your rubbish bin instead of a plastic bag - check out this website for more details
  • Instead of using plastic bags when walking the dog use newspaper to wrap up their business
  • Use paper rubbish sacks
  • Use glass or stainless steel drink bottles and reusable travel coffee mugs
  • Don't use plastic straws; don't use straws at all or use stainless steel straws
  • Use wooden toothbrushes and biogegradable dental floss
  • Make the most of bamboo and other natural fibre products!  You can purchase sustainable dish brushes, etc from EcoWarehouse or dish scrubs made from coconut husks.
  • Save glass jars and containers for storing bulk food and leftovers
  • When you have a crowd over and don't have enough for them to eat off make sure you use paper or biodegradable plates and bamboo cutlery or even better get them to bring some more plates and cutlery with them, less waste!

See other blogs on this topic:


Check out our range of plastic-free products - 30 % off

 

Plastic Free July: Plastic Free Shopping

Written by Stephanie on July 3rd, 2020.      0 comments

Here are some tips for limiting plastic when you are shopping this Plastic Free July.

 

EnviroSax-Oriental-Spice-Bag-4-542-569

General:

  • Say no to the plastic bags that shops give to carry your goods, see Limit Plastic Bag Use, always have a folded up bag or two in your handbag
  • Choose items in glass, paper, cardboard, etc as opposed to plastic
  • Avoid over-packaged products, go for products with the least plastic packaging
  • Go for reusable options where you can, eg refilling containers, refillable toner cartridges, etc


Food:EnviroSax-Oriental-Spice-Bag-4-Folded-31

  • Take your own containers for deli and butcher items, there are more us doing this now so you might not be the first for your butcher, you can do it
  • Buy loose fruit and veggies and not the ones pre-packaged, use your own cloth produce bags.
  • Buy nuts, dried fruit, flour, legumes, coffee, rice, oats, etc from bulk bins using paper bags of cloth bulk bin bags (check out your local Bin Inn Store)
  • Consider buying commonly used items like flour and rice in bulk and share with friends (bags are usually paper)
  • Purchase from a farmers market or your local farm shop and take your own bags
  • Take cloth bags or tea towels to your local baker (farmers market or farm shop) for bread, or better still make your own bread with your bulk flour!  You can make your own cloth bread bags by following these instructions
  • Buy wine with natural corks
  • Give up chewing gum (would you believe chewing gum has plastic!)
  • Buy loose tea leaves instead of tea bags, they also have plastic in them, let alone the plastic they wrap the boxes in
  • Grow your own veggies and fruit
Plastic Wrapped veges and fruit-607
Avoid pre-packaged items

Rethink-Produce-Full-26
Use cloth alternatives
 
                    

Cleaning Supplies:

  • Make your own cleaning products, there are lots of websites with recipes but check out Wendyl Nissen's recipes
  • Take your own reusable containers to refill at bulk buying shops such as Bin Inn
  • Use cleaning clothes such as Enjo, no other products are required
 

Bathroom Items:

             

See other blogs on this topic:


Check out our range of plastic free products - 30% off!

 

Plastic Free July: Plastic Free Meals on the Go

Written by Stephanie on July 2nd, 2020.      0 comments

Here are some tips for limiting plastic when you are eating and drinking on the go this Plastic Free July.

 

When Eating Out:

  • Take your own containers when ordering takeaways from somewhere that uses plastic (eg Indian), or find a takeaway joint that used eco-friendly packaging
  • Take your own container/s to restaurants for any leftovers
  • Carry reusable utensils such as bamboo or your own stainless steel cutlery from home when eating at places like food halls and when eating takeaways away from home.
 

Drinking on the Go:JOCO-12oz-vintage-green-974

  • Keep a reusable travel mug in your car at all times, as soon as it's been washed put in straight back in before you forget
  • Keep a reusable coffee mug on your desk at work
  • If you're going for a takeaway coffee while at work and have forgotten your reusable mug just grab one from the staff room
  • If  you forget your reusable mug when ordering a coffee ask for 'no lid'
  • Carry a reusable water bottle with you at all times or use a glass at your desk instead of the plastic cups
  • Say no to a straw when ordering cold drinks or carry stainless steel straws with you.
 

Snacking on the Go:

  • When ordering ice cream choose a cone over a tub
  • Look for a local sausage sizzle
  • Buy from bakeries, cafes, etc that use paper as opposed to plastic bags
  • Choose food that isn't pre-wrapped.
  • Take your own snacks in a non-plastic container or wrap them in honey wraps.


Plastic Free Travelling Kit:

It's best to be prepared in advance, then you never get caught out.  Have a kit set up in your car ready to go!  I've set up a kit that has:

  • Enamel cups
  • Cutlery, in a pencil case
  • Containers for sushi, food court, or doggy bag food. I love the U-Konserve stainless steel ones, they are so versatile. 
  • Stainless steel straws
  • Fabric serviettes
  • And of course, there's always a picnic blanket in the boot just in case.
Meals-on-the-go-kete
 
 

Plastic Free July: Limiting Plastic Bag Use

Written by Stephanie on July 1st, 2020.      0 comments

This month is Plastic Free July.  We're going to give you some tips on how to be plastic-free.  It's great that plastic bags are banned at the counter now but there is still plenty of plastic we can avoid when shopping.
 

How to Limit Plastic Bag Use

   
  • Store cloth bags in your car and/or handbag so you always have them when you out shopping.  Don't accept bags from stores, instead use your cloth bags.  The trick is to put them straight back in the car or in your bag when you've emptied them.
  • Don't buy fruit and veges pre-packaged in plastic, instead choose the loose items.  Use your own small cloth bags or paper bags to collect them, we love the Rethink produce bags.  
  • EnviroSax-Oriental-Spice-Bag-2-162Use cardboard boxes from the supermarket to carry your shopping
  • Buy fresh bread in paper bags, or even better make your own bread
  • Ask the butcher to wrap meats directly into paper or take your own reusable containers.  Our butcher (Wholly Cow in Hamilton and Cambridge) is more than happy fill our containers.
  • Buy bulk as much as you can to avoid over packaged products, then decant or free-flow when you get home.  Buy items from the bulk bins using paper bags or these great Rethink bulk bin bags.
  • Use newspaper to line your rubbish bin instead of a plastic bag - check out this website for more details or even go liner-free like we now are.  Buy paper rubbish sacks instead of the plastic ones from your supermarket, they are surprisingly tough.  To avoid mess and smell in your bin start composting, a worm farm, or get chickens for your scraps.  Or you can put your wet scraps in a container in the freezer until rubbish day.  But remember food scraps turn into methane in the landfill so composting, worm farms, or chickens are a better option.
  • Instead of using plastic bags when walking the dog use newspaper to wrap up their business.  Or you could look into cornstarch-based compostable bags online or from your pet supplier, then have a dedicated pet poo composting area.


Check out the plastic-free items in our online store - 30% off!

 

Waste Free Christmas

Written by Stephanie on December 2nd, 2019.      0 comments

Christmas is a fun time of year but it can also be very wasteful, there are many items that get used only once and are then thrown out for example wrapping paper, disposable cups, plates and cutlery. I'm sure we can still have a lot of fun but cut back our waste at the same time!
 

Decorations:

social-media-Candles-239Of course using what you already have is a good start but if you need a refresh on Christmas decorations how about ribbons, material bunting and folding paper decorations, stay away from unsustainable decorations (plastic and tinsel). Homemade items are always really good but if you don't have time for that you might find more sustainable decorations from websites like felt.co.nz.  I brought a fantastic 'Merry Christmas' bunting make of out woollen blankets on Felt a few years ago that will last for decades, I love it.  Beeswax candles make a lovely feature on the table.  And remember that the garden has lots to offer, not just flowers but foliage, pine cones and berries can look good as arrangements or placed on the table. And once used they can go to the compost!

Go rummaging around in 2nd hand shops and choose colourful candle sticks, vases, serving dishes, table cloth and cloth serviettes for the table. 
 

Crockery

It's best to avoid using disposable plates and utensils all together, but if you need disposables choose home compostable ones. You will need make it easy for your guests to know where to dispose scrap food and their plates and utensils, so a waste station that is clearly labelled is going to help.

If you don't have enough of your own crockery or utensils then ask friends and family to bring their own plates and/or utensils and take home afterwards. Or just borrow from friends or hire bits and pieces from a hireage company.
 

Cleaning up

Having a wash up station is a great idea. You can ask folk to wash 10 plates or get the kids on board to help. If the wash area is well set up people are happy to help, just keep an eye out for the very diligent helper and make sure you drag them out of the kitchen. You want everyone to have a turn. Make sure there are some special drinks and food nearby so they all get spoilt too!

We have a pretty complicated waste system with chicken, worm farm and compost scraps, paper, soft plastics and other recycling.  When we have gatherings at our place (and they can be be quite big with Martin being one of seven) I label were all the different things go so we don't add to the landfill.
 

Gifts

Try to avoid unhelpful gift buying and receiving by having lists, telling people you don’t need a gift, and discouraging secret Santa.  Sometimes we don’t need stuff but enjoy experiences and help.  We can take people on a little adventure, give them a massage, offer to do a chore, cook a special dinner or go on a picnic, there are so many ideas that you and your family could enjoy. You can create redeemable vouchers.  

Instead of secret Santa how about an alternative for example the exchange of favourite recipes, or even jokes, life hacks, fun facts, a favourite saying or piece of poetry, or even a compliment if you know the recipient - you might need to choose a theme so everyone is on board.  Our your could all donate to a special charity.

I've got loads of sustainable gift giving & wrapping ideas in my other blog post.
 

Catering

social-media-waste-free-celebrations-726Try to make dips, hummus and pate instead of the prepacked versions.  Make your own drinks instead of fizzy drinks in plastic bottles.  We use a soda stream that uses the same bottles over and over and add Barkers fruit concentrate to flavour them.  Barkers is in glass jars and use real fruit instead of flavours and colours.

There are shops that will fill your own containers like Hamilton Beer and Wine Co or the Good George. Of course there is the traditional beer swappa crate as well.

Get a little organised and try to make a salad rather than buy salads prepackaged at the supermarket.  Use a tried and true one to avoid stress or maybe you need some motivation and want to try a new recipe.  Remember when buying your salad greens avoid the ones in plastic!  

If you're taking a plate to someone else's house take it in a nice platter and cover it with an extra large Honeywrap, not only is it better for the environment, it looks great and you can leave the wrap behind as a gift for the host. 

It's a great time to start thinking outside the square and see what sustainable options you can bring into your Christmas celebrations this year.  Enjoy!
 

Get more tips on sustainable gift giving and wrapping
Check out Sweetree's sustainable gift range

 

Sustainable Gift Giving This Christmas

Written by Stephanie on November 12th, 2019.      0 comments

It's so hard to believe that we are in the middle of November and Christmas is just around the corner!  It can be a stressful time of year with everything winding up, buying gifts, planning Christmas day and holidays.  But once that's all out of the way it is a special time of year, time to spend with loved ones, time to put our feet up and take a well deserved breather after a busy year. 

Christmas is my favourite time of year but it can also be a very wasteful time of year and I'm going to be much more mindful of that wastage this year and minimise it as much as possible!  Here's some great sustainable tips on gift giving and wrapping.

Gift Giving

It can often be a struggle to find the right gifts for people.  A lot of our friends are trying to declutter and reduce the amount of 'stuff' they have and I really don't want to add more impractical, wasteful things to their lives.  And parents usually have everything they want.  Now when buying gifts I think to myself "Will this add to the world's waste problem?  Will this be useful or loved?" I will often ask if there is anything they want or need, at least then I know it won't be wasted.  Here's some good tips I've come across:

 

Gift Wrapping

I cringe at the amount of wrapping paper that is used once and then thrown out at Christmas.  Last year I came across a much better option and everyone that has received a gift wrapped this way has loved it!  Every time I go past a second hand shop I buy some scarfs and use them for wrapping gifts. It's a Japanese form of gift wrapping - furoshiki.  You can just search on Tube You for furoshiki and the item you are wrapping and get some great ideas.  There is no paper and no sellotape used and the greatest thing is the recipient can reuse it for a gift that they give!  I love it!  Here are just a few of the gifts I've given wrapped in scarfs and my basket of scarfs all ready to go.  By the way you can use any material and ribbons you like.  The world is your oyster! 

Scarf-Wrapping-1   Scarf-Basket

Check out our range of sustainable Christmas gifts


 

 

Conservation Week

Written by Stephanie on October 13th, 2019.      0 comments

Join Many New Zealanders from 14–22 September to celebrate 50 years of Conservation Week! 

New Zealand’s wildlife is still in crisis with more than 4,000 of our native animals and plants threatened or at risk. Conservation Week is a chance to bring everyone together to do something, big or small to create change.

Every year Conservation Week sees thousands of New Zealanders getting involved through doing conservation activities at home or attending one of many events hosted across the country. Creating change can be big or small, when we pull together, we can make a big difference.

Find out more and check out events near you
 
Conservation week-201
 

World Habitat Day

Written by Stephanie on October 7th, 2019.      0 comments

World Habitat Day-816Today is World Habitat Day.  What does that mean?

More than 30 years ago the United Nations designated the first Monday of October of every year as World Habitat Day to reflect on the state of our towns and cities, and on the basic right of all to adequate shelter. This year's theme is to harness frontier technologies to achieve sustainable waste management.

The UN says technology has great potential to improve how people work and live, to significantly accelerate efforts to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals and address climate change. Frontier technologies, such as automation, robotics, electric vehicles, renewable energy technologies, biotechnologies, and artificial intelligence can transform the social, economic and environmental spheres. They can offer better, cheaper, faster, scalable and easy to use solutions for every-day problems, including waste management.

Great news, sounds exciting!  

Find out more
 

Honeywraps Are Set Apart From Other Food-Wraps

Written by Stephanie on October 2nd, 2019.      0 comments

HoOrganic Cotton Honeywrap-288neywrap food wraps are set apart from other food-wraps, the most important difference is that they are made with certified organic fabric, and always have been. If you are serious about protecting the planet, as we are - then organic cotton is a must. Why would you choose non-organic for the same price? 

Normal cotton has one of the highest pesticides in the world - poisoning the soil, water ways and impacting the health of local communities. GOTs certified organic cotton uses no pesticides, thus is much better for the planet, local farmers, communities and us.

Another great difference is that the fabric is designed in collaboration with NZ artists and charities.  We love everything about Honeywrap food wraps!
 

Purchase honeywraps 

HoneyWrap XL Citygarden Bread-30-508-719
 
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