The Buzz Blog

Welcome to our blog 'The Buzz'.  Here we will keep you updated on what is happening in the world of bees and honey and anything else that we think you would be interested in.  If there is a topic you would like to hear about drop us an email and I'll see what we can do.


Do We Need Plastic Bags To Line Our Bins?

Written by Stephanie on August 16th, 2018.      0 comments

I've been cutting back on our plastic use for a few years now and this year I'm making a real concentrated effort to eliminate any plastic that can be replaced with something more sustainable.  Going completely plastic free may be unattainable but I'll just do the best I can to get as close as I can. 

One thing I struggled with for years is the idea of not putting a plastic bag in my rubbish bins as a liner.  The thought of no liners and having to scrub my bins out put me right off.  So I've just carried on using kitchen liners in my big kitchen bin and supermarket plastic bags in my other bins, but not been feeling good about it.  

As time went on and got into the habit of taking my own reusable cloth bags to the supermarket (every time I went) we had less plastic bags in the house so I ended up with none to put in the bins.  I had to slowly stop using liners in my bins, except I did carry on with bin liners for the kitchen bin.  I first started with the bedroom and computer desk bins, they mostly only had paper in them anyway.  Then I took the bold step of not using liners in the bathroom and toilet and you know it wasn't that bad.  I'm a waste freak and go through the bins and separate out paper, soft plastics recycling, and other recycling from the rubbish anyway.  I hardly ever have to clean out those bins they stay really clean.

Now the kitchen rubbish bin was a different story!  What was I going to do with that!  I hated that I was still using plastic and that took me to the even bolder step of using a newspaper liner.  Below is a video to show you how to make them, I actually get the kids to make it for me each time I empty the bin.  I only empty the bin once a week now and it is mostly only  1/4 - 1/2 full at the end of a week.  I can't believe that the newspaper liner holds everything and doesn't break, it's perfect!  Honestly, give it a go, what's the harm in trying!

The key has been that I have been cutting back waste for a while know, we put out 1 paper rubbish sack at the gate once every 4-6 weeks at the moment.  I'm finding our rubbish bins don't really have much messy stuff in them any more anyway, which really helps.
 

Here's some of my tips making sure your rubbish isn't wet or smelly for a newspaper liner:

  • No food scraps go in the bins.  We use a worm farm, compost and have chickens and sheep that love our scraps.  Anything they can't deal with gets buried in the garden to decompose (not sure if this is good or bad but my rubbish bin doesn't smell).
  • All soft plastics such as bread bags, chip packets, cat food bags, goes to the supermarket soft plastic recycling bin. Just make sure they are washed and dried first so they can be used or they will end up going to the landfill. If you buy meat in plastic this can be washed, dried and put in recycling too.  I buy my meat from my local butcher and take reusable containers for them to fill.
  • Swapping to a moon cup has been a huge waste mimimiser!  You could try that or reusable pads or something similar to cut out sanitary wastage.  I love that I now have no wastage there!  
  • If you have nappies in the house look at washable options, there are some great options out there now.  Also don't use baby wipes, try buying some cloths especially for this and wash and reuse them (I used to use small Chux cloths).
  • Use cloth napkins instead of serviettes and paper towels (I bought a whole lot 2nd hand) and reusable cloth pads instead of facial pads.

I'm sure there's more that I can't think of right now but you are most welcome to email me if I've forgotten a messy item that normally goes in the bin and I'll add it (if I have an alternative).

 
This video came from Boomerang Bags YouTube Channel
Topics: Reducing Waste
 

Plastic Free July: Tip #4 - Reduce Packaging

Written by Stephanie on July 30th, 2018.      0 comments


Monthly-PlasticThe photo to the right was a display at the Waikato Museum that shows how much packaging the average New Zealand family sends to the landfill every month.  Startling isn't it! Do you think your family uses this much packaging monthly?  I think if you held onto your plastics for a month you would be surprised how much you used!

You can just imagine what this is doing to the environment with everyone adding their bit to the landfill each month.  If we all did a little something to reduce the amount of packaging we use it will all help! 
 

Tips for Reducing Packaging in Our Homes:

  • Grow your own veges and fruit
  • Buy fresh, loose food rather than pre-packaged food, you can make or buy little cloth bags to put loose fruit or veges into
  • Say no to the plastic bags that shops give to carry your goods, see Limit Plastic Bag Use, take your own cloth bags instead.
  • Choose items in glass, paper, cardboard, etc as opposed to plastic
  • Buy nuts, dried fruit, flour, legumes, coffee, rice, oats, etc from bulk bins using cloth bin bags (check out your local Bin Inn Store)
  • Consider buying commonly used items like flour and rice in bulk and share with friends (bags are usually paper)
  • Avoid over packaged products, go for products with the least plastic packaging
  • Go for reusable options where you can, eg refilling containers, refillable toner cartridges, etc
  • Purchase from a Farmers Market or farm shop and take your own cloth bags
  • Store food in the fridge in a non-plastic container, in a bowl with a plate on the top or cover or wrap them in HoneyWraps or you make your own bowl covers
  • Make or buy fresh bread from the bakery and pop into a cloth bag, you can make your own
  • Wrap cheese in an old linen towel
  • Learn the art of furoshiki gift wrapping, it's fun!
  • Use reusable lunch boxes and wrap in HoneyWraps rather than plastic food wrap for lunches and snacks
  • Use newspaper to line your rubbish bin instead of a plastic bag - check out this website for more details
  • Instead of using plastic bags when walking the dog use newspaper to wrap up their business
  • Use paper rubbish sacks
  • Use glass or stainless steel drink bottles and reusable travel coffee mugs
  • Don't use plastic straws; don't use straws at all or use stainless steel straws
  • Use wooden toothbrushes and biogegradable dental floss
  • Make the most of bamboo and other natural fibre products!  You can purchase sustainable dish brushes, etc from EcoWarehouse
  • Save glass jars and containers for storing bulk food and leftovers
  • When you have a crowd over and don't have enough for them to eat off make sure you use paper or biodegradable plates and bamboo cutlery or even better get them to bring some more plates and cutlery with them, less waste!

See other blogs on this topic:


Check out our range of plastic free products

Topics: , Enviromental , Plastic Free , Reducing Waste
 

Plastic Free July: Tip #3 - Plastic Free Shopping

Written by Stephanie on July 25th, 2018.      0 comments

Here are some tips for limiting plastic when you are shopping this Plastic Free July.

 

EnviroSax-Oriental-Spice-Bag-4-542-569

General:

  • Say no to the plastic bags that shops give to carry your goods, see Limit Plastic Bag Use, always have a folded up bag or two in your handbag
  • Choose items in glass, paper, cardboard, etc as opposed to plastic
  • Avoid over packaged products, go for products with the least plastic packaging
  • Go for reusable options where you can, eg refilling containers, refillable toner cartridges, etc


Food:EnviroSax-Oriental-Spice-Bag-4-Folded-31

  • Take your own containers for deli and butcher items, there are more us doing this now so you might not be the first for your butcher, you can do it
  • Buy loose fruit and veggies and not the ones pre-packaged
  • Use your own cloth produce bags for fruit and vegies
  • Buy nuts, dried fruit, flour, legumes, coffee, rice, oats, etc from bulk bins using paper bags of cloth bulk bin bags (check out your local Bin Inn Store)
  • Consider buying commonly used items like flour and rice in bulk and share with friends (bags are usually paper)
  • Purchase from a farmers market or your local farm shop and take your own bags
  • Take cloth bags or tea towels to your local baker (farmers market or farm shop) for bread, or better still make your own bread with your bulk flour!  You can make your own cloth bread bags by following these instructions
  • Buy wine with natural corks
  • Give up chewing gum (would you believe chewing gum has plastic!)
  • Buy loose tea leaves instead of teabags, they also have plastic in them, let alone the plastic they wrap the boxes in
  • Grow your own veggies and fruit
Plastic Wrapped veges and fruit-607
Avoid pre-packaged items

Rethink-Produce-Full-26
Use cloth alternatives
 
                    

Cleaning Supplies:

  • Make your own cleaning products, there are lots of websites with recipes but check out Wendyl Nissen's recipes
  • Take your own reusable containers to refill at bulk buying shops such as Bin Inn
  • Use cleaning clothes such as Enjo, no other products are required
 

Bathroom Items:

             

See other blogs on this topic:


Check out our range of plastic free products

Topics: , Enviromental , Plastic Free , Reducing Waste
 

Plastic Free July: Tip #2 - Plastic Free Meals on the Go

Written by Stephanie on July 17th, 2018.      0 comments

Here's some tips for limiting plastic when you are eating and drinking on the go this Plastic Free July.

 

When Eating Out:

  • Take your own containers when ordering takeaways from somewhere that uses plastic (eg Indian), or find a takeaway joint that used eco-friendly packaging
  • Take your own container/s to restaurants for any leftovers
  • Carry reusable utensils such as bamboo or your own stainless steel cutlery from home when eating at places like food halls and when eating takeaways away from home.
 

Drinking on the Go:JOCO-12oz-vintage-green-974

  • Keep a reusable travel mug in your car at all times, as soon as it's been washed put in straight back in before you forget
  • Keep a reusable coffee mug on your desk at work
  • If you're going for a takeaway coffee while at work and have forgotten your reusable mug just grab one from the staff room
  • If  you forget your reusable mug when ordering a coffee ask for 'no lid'
  • Carry a reusable water bottle with you at all times or use a glass on your desk instead of the plastic cups
  • Say no to a straw when ordering cold drinks or carry stainless steel straws with you.
 

Snacking on the Go:

  • When ordering ice cream choose a cone over a tub
  • Look for a local sausage sizzle
  • Buy from bakeries, cafes, etc that use paper as opposed to plastic bags
  • Choose food that isn't pre-wrapped.
  • Take your own snacks in a non-plastic container or wrap them in honey wraps.


 
Topics: , Enviromental, Plastic Free
 

Plastic Free July: Tip #1 - Limit Plastic Bag Use

Written by Stephanie on July 9th, 2018.      0 comments

As mentioned in my last blog post this month is Plastic Free July.  We're going to give you some tips on how to be plastic free.  These tips on our how to avoid plastic bag use.
 

How to Limit Plastic Bag Use

 
  • Store cloth bags in your car and/or handbag so you always have them when you out shopping.  Don't accept plastic bags from stores, instead use your cloth bags.  The trick is to put them straight back in the car or in your bag when you've emptied them.
  • Don't buy fruit and veges pre-packaged in plastic, instead choose the loose items.  Use your own small cloth bags or paper bags to collect them, we love the Rethink produce bags.  
  • EnviroSax-Oriental-Spice-Bag-2-162Use cardboard boxes from the supermarket to carry your shopping
  • Buy fresh bread in paper bags, or even better make your own bread
  • Ask the butcher to wrap meats directly into paper or take your own reusable containers.  Our butcher (Wholly Cow in Hamilton and Cambridge) is more than happy fill our containers.
  • Buy bulk as much as you can to avoid over packaged products, then decant or free-flow when you get home.  Buy items from the bulk bins using paper bags or these great Rethink bulk bin bags.
  • Ask your local grocery store and/or market to stock paper/cloth bags, if they don't already.  Or organise some boomerang bags for them.
  • Use newspaper to line your rubbish bin instead of a plastic bag - check out this website for more details.  Buy paper rubbish sacks instead of the plastic ones from your supermarket, they are surprising tough.  To avoid mess and smell in your bin start composting, a worm farm or get chickens for your scraps.  Or you can put your wet scraps in a container in the freezer until rubbish day.  But remember food scraps turn into methane in the landfill so composting, worm farms or chickens are a better option.
  • Instead of using plastic bags when walking the dog use newspaper to wrap up their business.  Or you could look into cornstarch based compostable bags online or from your pet supplier, then have a dedicated pet poo composting area.


See other blogs on this topic:


Check out the plastic free items in our online store!

Topics: , Enviromental, Plastic Free , Reducing Waste
 

Plastic Free July!

Written by Stephanie on July 1st, 2018.      0 comments

Plastic bottles, bags and takeaway containers that we use just for a few minutes use a material that is designed to last forever.  They break up rather than break down (becoming permanent pollution), and they are either unrecyclable or down-cycled (made into low-grade products for just one more use).  When sent to the landfill they can escape from bins and trucks to end up in our waterways and the ocean.  

Alarmingly scientists predict that there will be more tonnes of plastic in the ocean than tonnes of fish by 2050!  Imagine the impact on our food chain!  Every bit of plastic ever made still exists and in the first 10 years of this century, the world economy produced more plastic than in the entire 1900's!!

 

What is Plastic Free July?

This month is 'Plastic Free July'  It is a simple idea developed in Australia in 2011, which aims to raise awareness of the amount of plastic in our lives by encouraging people to eliminate the use of single-use plastic during July each year.  What a fantastic way of reducing plastic!  We love it!!

They have created a challenge that you can sign up for.  Schools, cafes, government agencies and community groups across the world have joined thousands of individuals saying no to single-use plastic.

Of course, you don't have to sign up, but just take the challenge yourself.  The challenge is quite simple - attempt to refuse single-use plastic during July.  'Single-use' includes plastic shopping bags, plastic cups, straws, plastic packaging...basically anything that's intended only to be used once and then discarded. If refusing ALL single-use plastic sounds too daunting this time, try the TOP 4 challenge (straws, plastic bags, plastic bottles & coffee cup lids).
 

Avoid These:


plastic-free-july-line-single-use-products orig-555


Instead, Use These:

plastic-free-july-reusables-banner orig-463
 
 

What are We Doing for Plastic Free July?

Sweetree and our household will be taking the challenge again.  We've been taking it every year for the past few years and it's made a big difference to our waste. We took baby steps at the start, which seemed hard at the time but now we only put out a rubbish bag about once a month (that includes the business and home).  

We store food in glass jars and containers, use old biscuits tins for baking, using stainless steel drink bottles, reusable coffee cups, use reusable bags when shopping, take our own containers to the butcher, we've ditched liners in our rubbish bins and use paper rubbish sacks, use Honeywraps instead of plastic food wrap, use stainless steel strawsshampoo, face and body bars, etc.  We love some plastic free products so much we now sell them on our website for you to also enjoy!

Our focus this July and ongoing at home is reducing more plastic packaging by looking at better options (glass, paper, homemade, etc) when purchasing and being more prepared when having takeaway meals (I'm getting together a travelling kit).

All our honey is stored in glass jars, we don't use plastic frames in our beehives, our propolis is in glass bottles, we use paper bags instead of plastic at the markets, we're avoiding plastic in our production and product deliveries.  Any soft plastic (eg from pallets of jars, etc) get recycled into outdoor furniture.  But we can always do better!   This month, and ongoing, we will really be careful about the products that we buy and eliminate plastic packaging, especially single-use plastic, as much as possible.  



Why not join thousands taking the challenge to refuse single-use plastic?  Any time is better than none - a day or a week, the whole month or longer!  If you want to you can sign upto get recipes, ideas & everything you need to take part.  We will be posting more blogs with ideas of how you can reduce plastic throughout the month also.

Look out for my weekly blog this month on how to reduce plastic use this 'Plastic Free July'.  Like us on Facebook to keep up to date!

Check out the plastic free product range in our online store!

Topics: , Plastic Free
 

Waste Pyramid - Reduce Wastage

Written by Stephanie on June 7th, 2018.      0 comments

This second blog in my 'waste pyramid' blogs is about reducing waste.  If we can't avoid waste then we need to try and reduce it as much as possible.

I've already covered food waste in my previous blog so please check that out.  


Rethink-Produce-Full-26Other Things We Can Do To Reduce Waste:

  • Borrow instead of buying
  • Buy second hand instead of new
  • Learn to repair or get someone else to repair things rather than throwing out, it's amazing what a new lease of life items get by doing this
  • Wrap presents in fabric or use reusable paper gift bags
  • Take your own reusable containers for takeaway food and drinks
  • Take your own containers to the butcher for your meat
  • Take reusable cloth bags everywhere you go
  • Look into getting chickens, start a compost bin or/and worm farm to reduce food scrap wastage
  • Do not buy drinks in plastic
  • Avoid single use plastic 
  • Ditch plastic straws
  • Have a 'no circulars' sign on your letterbox
  • Plan your meals and use left overs for lunches or other meals
  • Use the bulk bins or buy bulk through a food co-op
  • Use cloth napkins instead of servettes

There is so much we could all be doing!
 

To Help Our Earth Start Using Re-usable / Plastic Free Products

We've decided it's so important that we all take care of our world that we now sell a range of plastic free products  to help our customers start to make a difference:​
Topics: , Enviromental, Recycle , Reducing Waste
 

Waste Pyramid - Refuse Wastage!

Written by Stephanie on May 30th, 2018.      0 comments

The way things are going I'm worried earth is going to end up like the movie WALL-E, where humans were driven off earth because it was unsustainable to live there anymore.  People were consuming at a fast pace without thought, while the earth was piled up with mountains of rubbish until nothing would grow anymore.  The mountains of rubbish in the movie looked the the recycling piles that are growing in New Zealand right now - have a look at this, we can't ignore it so easily when it's on our back doorstep!
 
Huntly Refuse Centre

We've all be sucked into the consumer age but we need to try and get ourselves out of it for the sake of the planet and future generations!  This first blog in my 'waste pyramid' blogs is about refusing waste.  This is the first thing we need to think about when we purchase items and we need to be asking questions of ourselves before we buy things.  We need to refuse wastage!
 

Before Purchasing Ask Ourselves:

  • Do I really need a new ...?  Can we do without it?
  • Could I get the old one fixed rather than replace it?
  • Could I buy second hand?
  • Could I borrow from someone, if it is something I don't use often?

 

When Purchasing Always:

  • Consider the less packaged option, refuse over-packaged items
  • Choose items that you can get parts for and can be fixed if broken or refilled/reused
  • Refuse single use plastic, styrofoam, etc
  • Refuse plastic! We'll have more on this over plastic free July but some tips are:
    • Choose items in glass, paper, and cardboard over plastic
    • Take your own re-usable coffee cup when getting a takeaway coffee
    • Carry a reusable non-plastic drink bottle
    • Take your own containers to takeway places you know will use plastic or styrofoam
    • Store containers, reusable utensils, straws, etc in your car for meals on the go
    • Choose skin and haircare in bar form, in tin or glass over plastic bottles
    • Always have reusable shopping bags in your car/s and in your handbag
    • Use reusable containers, paper or wax wraps for school/work lunches.
 

Refuse By Using Reusable Products Such As:

Ethique hair and body bars
Joco coffee cups and stainless straws
Reusable shopping/produce/bulk bin bags
Biodegradable dental care products
Honey in glass jars
Honeywrap food wraps

We've decided it's so important that we all take care of our world that we now sell a range of plastic free products  to help our customers start to make a difference.
 
Topics: , Enviromental, Recycle , Reducing Waste
 

Waste Busters Workshop Week 2

Written by Stephanie on May 24th, 2018.      0 comments

We've just had week two of the 'Waste Busters' weekly workshop at Go Eco in Hamilton.  It's an opportunity to share ideas on creating less waste, having fun making waste-free products and chatting about creating change in our world.  

Did you know that putting your food waste into the rubbish bin increased our green house gases!!!  The food will  decompose without oxygen and release methane gas, which over time raises the earth temperature.  Find out more here - Love Food Hate Waste.
 

FoodWaste-900Growing Food To Reduce Waste


This week we covered growing food to reduce waste.  If we grow some of our own food we reduce wastage in many areas, we reduce:
  •  Water and resources associated with intenstive growing
  • Transport costs
  • Imperfection waste (only the good looking fruit or veges get sold in stores and imperfect items usually get dumped)
  • Spoilage (so long as we share or preserve our surplus)
  • Packaging (single use plastic)
Not to mention reducing our costs!

Not only can you grow your own fruit, veges and berries but you can easily grow your own micro-greens and sprouts.  Micro-greens and sprouts are a great way to start!
 

Options for Food Waste

  • Start a compost bin or bokashi unsink system (so easy)
  • Maintain a worm farm
  • Have chickens or feed someone else's chickens, or pigs
  • If you have surplus produce then share with friends or neighbours or if you have a lot of surplus contact a community food bank or an organisation like Kiavolution that distributes food to those in need.
Topics: , Enviromental , Reducing Waste
 

Waste Busters Workshop Week 1

Written by Stephanie on May 20th, 2018.      0 comments

I've just joined a 'Waste Busters' weekly workshop with Go Eco in Hamilton.  It's an opportunity to share ideas on creating less waste, having fun making waste-free products and chatting about creating change in our world.  It will cover: food, the garden, cleaning (personal and home), celebrations, work, recreation and travelling.  Can't wait to learn some new tricks!

It is great that most people are recycling their plastics and other recyclables.  But did you know that China are no longer taking other countries recycling?  Many of New Zealand's recycling centres have plastic piling up with no where for it to go!  Have a read of this example in Huntly where the Huntly transfer station is described as 'slums of Mumbai'.  It's a real concern!

So reducing waste is even more important than ever!  

In session one we talked about what waste is and how to avoid it. I love this definition of waste - 'Waste is a resource we haven't figured out what to do with yet'.  It's so true!  If we think outside the square there might be a use for our waste, we just need to stop and think before we throw things out!

This waste pyramid is very helpful to remember when you are thinking about waste.


Waste Pyramid

Refuse:
When purchasing items or food refuse unnecessary packaging and single-use plastic.  For example purchase items in glass or paper rather than plastic.  Do you even need the item in the first place?  Can you do without? 

Reduce:
If you can't avoid waste then try to reduce it as much as possible, can you borrow instead of buy or buy second hand?  Look to get chickens, start a compost bin or/and worm farm to reduce food scrap wastage.

Reuse:
Can you use it for something else?  If you have to buy things in plastic containers, reuse them for storing items and food.  Pass on unwanted clothes and items to others, there are always people in need.  Mabye give old containers, lids, egg cartons, scraps of material, wood, etc to your local Playcentre for childrens craft. 

Recycle:
If you can't refuse, reduce or reuse then recycle.  Use your councils recycle bins, put all your soft plastics in the specified bin at the supermarket.  Remember to use recycle bins when you're out instead of just rubbish bins, if there aren't recycling bins available then please take items home to add to your recycling.

Recover:
You may be able to recover materials or energy from waste.  I just love this story about some retired men in Wanganui turning trash into cash for the community, check it out!

Dispose:
Finally if you are unable to refuse, reduce, reuse, recycle or recover then the final resort is to dispose of the item in the landfill.  The least the better!

I've been thinking lately that if we have the mindset of people in the great depression that would really help our environment, treat everything as a resource to be used to it's full potential and not wasted.

 

To Help Our Earth Start Using Re-usable / Plastic Free Products

We've decided it's so important that we all take care of our world that we now sell a range of plastic free products  to help our customers start to make a difference:​
 
Topics: , Enviromental, Plastic Free , Recycle , Reducing Waste
 

World Bee Day

Written by Stephanie on May 20th, 2018.      0 comments

World Bee Day logoToday is the first annual World Bee Day! The United Nations declared the date as World Bee Day in December 2017, after years of campaigning by the Republic of Slovenia to get recognition for bees and their importance to the environment.

It's all about raising awareness about the critical role of honey bees in our communities and economy, and the need to protect their health.

Bees are critically important to New Zealand and to the New Zealand economy – much more so than you might think! Without bees, our gardens would be without many of their plants and flowers, and our major agri-export industries (worth around $5 billion) would be in severe trouble! At least one-third of our food depend on honey bees for pollination, this food provides us 35% of our calories, most of our minerals, vitamins, and anti-oxidants. What would happen to our nutrient food intake and in turn our health if our bees disappeared? Albert Einstein said, “If the Bee Disappeared Off the Face of the Earth, Man Would Only Have Four Years Left To Live".

Honeybee colonies are dying or disappearing in record numbers in the USA. Thriving colonies disappear overnight without leaving a trace. The bees seem to fly off never to return, leaving the queen bee and mother of the hive to starve to death.
 

Read what you can do to help our precious bees

 

We Love JOCO Reusable Cups!

Written by Stephanie on May 8th, 2018.      0 comments

New Zealanders throw away tens of thousands of takeaway cups every day!  These cups, that we use only once, can take 200 years to break down into tiny toxic particles that affect our precious oceans and sea life. 

JOCO2 months cups-655-295

The great news is that if you like takeaway coffee or tea you don’t have to give them up to look after our environment! Just swap to reusable!
 

We Love The JOCO Reusable Cups!


JOCO cups are designed to enhance your morning brew, save your taste buds and help out mother nature.
Most of us have had a coffee or tea served in a disposable paper or Styrofoam cup. Annually, over 500 billion disposable paper, Styrofoam and single-use plastic cups are used worldwide and this figure is rapidly rising each year. Shockingly, these cups deplete natural resources, increase C02 emissions and most are sent straight to landfill where they add to the global waste crises.  That equates to 50,000,000 trees cut down and harvested for the sake of convenience.
 

There’s a Whole Host of Benefits For You and The Natural Environment When Using JOCO Reusable Cups:

 
1.  Don't Beat Up Your Tastbuds
JOCO cups are made from high quality, non-porous, borosilicate glass. They are lightweight and resistant to extreme changes in temperature. Their superior durability makes them microwave and dishwasher safe. Your JOCO cup is free of all harmful chemical nasties including BPA, lead and cadmium. Glass doesn’t affect flavour so you will taste your coffee or tea, not your cup.

2.  It's All In The Details
Just like the attention that goes into brewing a good tea or coffee, JOCO takeaway cups have been designed and created with an absolute passion for the little things. JOCO cups are first-class.


Thermal Sleeve
The thermal silicone sleeve keeps your coffee or tea at the optimal temperature and your hands cool.

Splash Proof and Nose-Dome Lid
Our one-way lid means no more coffee splashes when you are on the go. The specially designed nose-dome feature means no more embarrassing nose to lid collisions.

Barista Friendly
The liquid volume of the glass cups is measured from standard takeaway cup sizes. We keep the baristas happy and they approve your JOCO cup with thumbs up.

JOCO thermal-sleeve-919-252  JOCO barista-certified-189

Purchase JOCO cups here!


Information and photos curtesy of www.jococups.com 

 

Honey for Allergies

Written by Stephanie on April 25th, 2018.      0 comments

MSprg-2-spoonWe have many customers that find buying the Sweetree honey variety produced closest to their home beneficial for reducing hay fever symptoms. If you are one of these customers you may find that your normal honey variety is unavailable (due to a very poor honey harvest this season). I would recommend that you try one of our other honeys we have in stock, even if it is a long way from your home. Our honeys are not finely filtered, therefore still retaining a high pollen count, which will help with hay fever. Give it a try and let us know how you get on.

Another option is to take small amounts of bee pollen each day (especially leading up to spring), this can also help descensitize your body against hay fever.
 

Buy Sweetree Honey with high pollen counts here

Buy Sweetree Bee Pollen here

Topics: , Products
 

A Poor Honey Harvest

Written by Stephanie on April 18th, 2018.      0 comments

You may have heard that honey harvests were poor this season. It is fair to say we had a pretty shocking season. We have harvested about two thirds less honey that we would normally harvest. The Waikato was hit the hardest. Apiary sites that we would typically harvest about 50 boxes of honey from, we harvested just 2-4 boxes. So I'm afraid to say we will not have these honeys available this year - Horsham Downs, Four Brothers, Hakarimata (apart from the batch from last season we still have in stock) and Kirikiriroa.

The good news is that it was a reasonable season at Marokopa so we have Marokopa Spring and Marokopa Manuka and will shortly have Marokopa Summer available. The Marokopa Summer and Marokopa Manuka honeys didn't come easy as there was a freak weather event in Marokopa that swept a huge amout of water through the valley and there were several slips on the sheep station we have our hives on. A lot of the farm tracks collapsed so it made it very tricky getting the honey out, but we did it!

 

Why Such A Bad Season?


The variable weather at the end of last year and early this year have interrupted the honey flow, and added to this was the severe weather patterns (storms, cyclones,) and then extreme heat. Bees can't fly in strong winds or rain so during those times the bees stay in the hive, therefore reducing their nectar collecting time. The severe weather can strip flowers from trees/plants leaving less flowers for the bees to forage on as well.

The very wet spring appears to have affected clover flowering and nectar production. Even though you may have seen clover flowers this summer, little nectar was produced. Very hot weather can burn summer crops and honey flow virtually stops. The bees end up gathering water, instead of nectar, to try and cool down the hives.

Despite the challenges the bees have come out of the season very healthy and strong, they just haven’t been able to collect a surplus this year. With the season officially over, some of our bees have been treated to a late nectar flow which will keep them going over the winter quite nicely.

 
Marokopa-Slip-804





Marokopa-Track-103
Marokopa-Trolly-15
One of the many slips in Marokopa The track had collapsed in many areas Walking up to check the hives and move by trolly if needed.


Check out what's in season in our honey store

    
Topics: , About Sweetree, Products
 

We've Got Ethique Face, Body and Hair Bars!

Written by Stephanie on March 31st, 2018.      0 comments

You may have guessed that at Sweetree we are passionate about taking care of our environment, our focus at the moment is reducing plastic and waste.  We're so excited to be stocking Ethique beauty bars, we LOVE everything Ethique stands for and their products! Zero plastic packaging, palm oil free, petrochemical free, paraben free, sustainably produced, 100% vegan & cruelty-free beauty bars full of natural goodness.

They produce face, hair and body solid bars which last between three to six times longer (depending on the product) than bottled products; because they’re super-concentrated.  NZ Ethique customers have already saved the Earth from 280,000 plastic bottles, how good is that!

Join us in the revolution and give up the bottle!  #giveupthebottle
 

Purchase Ethique solid bars now

 
Ethique Group Blog-442
Topics: , Enviromental , Plastic Free
 
ab.jpg

Read our blog to see what’s happening

Read our blog to keep up to date with what we are up to!
Find out more
ab.jpg

What do our customers say?

"This honey so delicious!  It taste just like when I was a kid, rather than the supermarket brands"  Anna Bradford, Rotorua
Read more customer feedback