The Buzz Blog

Welcome to our blog 'The Buzz'.  Here we will keep you updated on what is happening in the world of bees and honey and anything else that we think you would be interested in.  If there is a topic you would like to hear about drop us an email and I'll see what we can do.


Why Do Bees Sting?

Written by Stephanie on November 30th, 2017.      0 comments

bee sting
Have you ever been stung by a bee?  I think I have only been stung once when I was about 10 years old.  I still remember it clearly as if it was yesterday.  I was walking in the grass in my lovely red roman sandals at school and as I lifted by foot to walk a bee flew under my toes and as I stepped it stung me.  It gave me a huge fright and man did it sting!  I didn't get a reaction and I don't even remember how I got the sting out but from then on I was scared of bees and getting stung again.
 
Of course, after meeting Martin I have grown a new appreciation for bees and I am now comforted by the fact that a honey bee will rarely sting when it is away from its hive foraging for nectar or pollen.  The only reason a bee would sting someone is if they stepped on it or handled it roughly.  Bees will, however, attack intruders who are disturbing their hive.  Hence Martin has had hundreds of stings!  When a bee stings it also releases an ‘alarm pheromone’ to signal to other bees in the hive to attack.  This is one of the reasons why beekeepers use smokers when they are working hives, it covers up the alarm pheromones.  Because the worker bees release the alarm pheromone when threatened Martin is very careful not to crush or harm the bees when harvesting honey.

So my advice to you would be - don’t wave your arms around when a bee comes near you, just sit there quietly and still and when it realizes you are not a flower it will move on.  And if you are going to look into a beehive always wear a suit!
 

Here are some interesting facts about bees and their stings:

  • Bees are the only insect with a strongly barbed sting
  • As the sting lodges into the victim’s skin, it tears loose from the bee’s abdomen and the bee die within minutes
  • The female bees (the queen and the worker bees) are the only ones that sting
  • The queen’s stinger is smooth so can, therefore, sting over and over (but don’t worry she never leaves the hive unless she is swarming to find a new home)
  • A swarm of bees is not aggressive, they are just looking for a new home and have no honey or young to defend
  • The large drone bees do not have stingers
  • A bee sting consists of three parts – a stylus and two barbed sides

The next blog will give you some tips on what to do if you are stung.


Some information for this blog was research from www.en.wikipedia.org and www.wisegeek.com
Topics: Bee Facts
 

Christmas Gift Buying Time!

Written by Stephanie on November 11th, 2017.      0 comments

Can you believe it's only six Fridays until Christmas! There are actually only five Fridays until our last courier delivery for the year!  So it's time to think about Christmas gifts.


Check out our gift range here!

 
Christmas Gifts Promo-89-462-757-44-717-209
 

Sustainable Me Challenge - November

Written by Stephanie on November 11th, 2017.      0 comments

Vegetable-Growing-228-91This month's 'Sustainable Me Challenge' is to grow something.  Most of our produce is trucked, shipped or flown and it accumulates greenhouse gas emissions with every kilometre travelled.  To help our environment we should at least buy local, where we can, and grow some of our own food.  
 

Here's What The Challenge Suggests:

Beginner: Buy local.  Look for NZ grown produce at the supermarket or visit your local farmer's market or farm shop.

Step it up: Plant something.  Start with strawberries, lettuce, spinach, herbs, etc

Want more? Grow more!  Challenge yourself t grow something new or grow everything you need for an entire meal.  Or if you're already a keen gardener help someone else set up a garden.

Every little bit helps!

See the OSOF website to read more tips


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Topics: , Enviromental
 

Sustainable Me Challenge - October

Written by Stephanie on November 10th, 2017.      0 comments

red meat Wow, time is flying and I've just realised I haven't blogged about the 'Sustainable Me Challenge' for a while!

October's challenge was to eat less meat!  Kiwi's love meat, we are ranked 11th per capita for meat consumption.  We eat on average 106kgs per year.  And the problem?  The problem is that high levels of meat consumption impacts both our environment and our health.

 

Large-scale farming produces a huge amount of emissions, contributing significantly to global warming.  Runoff from animal waste enters soils, groundwater and rivers. Farming requires a lot of water use, apparently it takes 15,500 litres of water to produce just 1kg of beef!  Wow!  There is also an association between meat consumption and health problems such as heart disease, diabetes and colon cancer.
 

Here's What The Challenge Suggests:

Beginner: Join the Meat Free Monday campaign by eating vegetarian one day per week.

Step it up: Give up meat 3 or 4 days per week.

Want more? Try going fully vegetarian, mmm not sure how well that will go down in our house!

I think that if we can just be more conscious about how much meat we are eating, cut down on its consumption each meal and have at least 1 meatless meal a week it will make a different! 

See the OSOF website to read more tips


Read more about:

Topics: , Enviromental
 
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