The Buzz Blog

Welcome to our blog 'The Buzz'.  Here we will keep you updated on what is happening in the world of bees and honey and anything else that we think you would be interested in.  If there is a topic you would like to hear about drop us an email and I'll see what we can do.


Feed Bees in Your Garden Over Winter

Written by Stephanie on March 31st, 2019.      0 comments


Now's the time to think about what plants you will have in your garden over the wintertime for bees. Everyone thinks that bees hibernate over the winter time but actually they don't. Bees stop flying when the temperatures drop down to around 10 degree celsius. They stay inside the hive and go into a big huddle to keep as warm as possible, this is called a winter cluster. The queen is kept inside the cluster to keep her warm and safe. The colder the temperature the more compact the cluster becomes. The worker bees create heat by shivering and they also move back and forth between the inner part of the cluster and the outer part. In this way no bee will freeze in very cold climates.

On nice sunny winter days you can see bees flying short distances out of the hive and then quickly returning.  The trouble is that is is often a dearth of flowers for them to forage on over winter, so it's great to have some plants flowering in your garden over the wintertime for them.


Here's a list of flowers you could have in your gardens for bees over the wintertime:

  • coneflowerAconite
  • Rosemary
  • Borage
  • Pineapple sage
  • Lung wort
  • Heather
  • Mahonia 
  • Sedums
  • Rudbeckia
  • Japanese anenomes
  • Primrose
  • Willow
  • Cornflower
  • Wallflower
  • Camellias
  • Helenium
  • Fatsia japonica
  • Strawberry tree
  • Blue Bells
  • Winter-flowering Clematis
  • Winter-flowering honeysuckle
  • Monarda
  • Native hebes
  • Cornelian cherry
  • Winter-flowering cherry trees


For more ideas on planting for bees please check out the Tree For Bees website

Topics: Bee Friendly
 

Happy with Honey Harvest

Written by Stephanie on March 28th, 2019.      0 comments

Last weekend we completed our harvest of this seasons honey!  Thank goodness it was a lot better than last year and our bees had plenty of surplus honey for us to harvest.  We always make sure we leave plenty of honey for the bees to keep them going over winter and build up over spring.  Our bees made it through the winter very well and were healthy and strong going into this season, with the honey we left them at the end of last season.  It meant we didn't have much variety to sell but we don't think pumping them up with sugar syrup (like may beekeepers do) is good for their health.

It was a good year for Waikato honey so we will have new season Marokopa Spring, Four Brothers Reserve, Hakarimata, Kirikiriroa, and Horsham Downs honey available this year.   We still have some Ohui Manuka and Marokopa Summer from last season and we've already packed this seasons award-winning Marokopa Spring, Four Brothers Reserve will be available next week and Hakarimata the week after that.  We will then be working on packing the Kirikiriroa and Horsham Downs honeys.  
 

Check the online store for your favourite Sweetree honey!

 
Harvest-checking-frames
Martin checking through the honey frames at Horsham Downs before harvesting the honey
Topics: , About Sweetree
 

Sweetree Wins Gold!

Written by Stephanie on March 19th, 2019.      2 comments

2019-Gold-LabelWe entered our Marokopa Spring honey into the 'Outstanding NZ Food Producers Awards' and it's just won GOLD!

We were up against many other products in 'the earth' category such as; honey, spreads, condiments, loaves, crackers, and nuts.  Outstanding NZ Food Producer Award's organiser Kathie Bartley says “This was a great result for Sweetree, we had some awesome honey products this year.”  We're proud that Waikato honey is up there on top!  Waikato's pasture and bush, and of course our bees are pretty special!

The Outstanding NZ Food Producers awards celebrate Kiwis who harvest, grow and make food and drinks.  And judging was on these criteria:
  • PRODUCT: Quality, taste, consistency, visual appearance, innovation, packaging (if applicable), innovation (80%)
  • SUSTAINABILITY: Sustainable business practices in producing the product (10%)
  • BRAND STORY: The story of your brand, how you got here, where you’re going, what makes your product special and demonstrates your passion. (10%).

Check out the award-winning Marokopa Spring honey

We're sure you'll love Marokopa Spring honey as well!  Check out our feedback from customers:


"There is always honey in our house but it's usually the budget brand. After tasting Sweetree Marokopa Spring honey I can see why people pay the extra price. I was told that people eat it by the spoonful and I was thinking to myself that honey isn't that tasty that I would ever do that. Well, after seeing the yummy looking honey in the lovely labelled jar I had to try it and wow, it was yummo. I don't think I could go back to the budget brand now."
Caroline Rainham, Levin

"I received my order of honey today and I just wanted to thank you guys so much for the effort you put in.  The package was securely wrapped, it was fast delivery and I honestly couldn't be happier.  I was not expecting even half of the effort put in so thank you so much.  I just wanted to let you guys know that you are doing a great job and I will definitely be ordering from you guys again as well as recommending your business."
Nikita Rindel, Christchurch
 

Read about other awards we have won

Outstanding-Producers-Award
Topics: , About Sweetree
 

So Many Reasons to Love Honeywrap Food Wraps!

Written by Stephanie on March 16th, 2019.      0 comments

There are so many reasons to love Honeywrap food wraps....

  • Honeywrap is one of the only beeswax wraps that use GOTS Organic cotton.  Honeywraps mission is to protect the planet and that can't be done without choosing organic cotton.  Organic cotton is made without pesticides therefore it is better for the environment, the farmers and eventually our own health as our skin and food is not exposed to the harmful chemicals used in the manufacturing process of traditional cotton.
  • HoneyWrap-Medium-11Honeywrap customers have now saved the equivalent of 11 million meters of plastic from going to landfills and oceans and encouraged people to use more beautiful, sustainable alternatives!
  • They are locally and hand-made
  • The Fabrics are collaborations with Kiwi artists such as Evie Kemp, Natty
  • Honeywraps provide work for people with disabilities with the Create Your Own Starter Kits
  • Honeywrap supported over 100 different causes in 2018 with donations
  • They can be used as a non-slip mat perfect to stop plates or chopping boards from slipping on the bench
  • They make great place-mats for little hands
  • Honeywraps' make awesome jar openers - for those really stuck lids and when you don't have any muscles about!
  • Honeywraps are fine to be posted overseas; making an awesome gift for overseas visitors- small and easy to post with a little kiwiana
  • We love that Honeywraps can be composted after they have come to the end of their life, it's recommended to cut them up so they break down faster.


Purchase Honeywraps here

HoneyWraps-group
 
 
Topics: , Enviromental , Products
 

Jam to the Food Bank

Written by Stephanie on March 7th, 2019.      0 comments

You may recall that a small group of us ladies get together to make jam from surplus fruit picked or donated, pour it into recycled Sweetree honey jars and give them to our local food bank.  We have recently made some delicious plum and strawberry jams (plums thanks to our neighbour and strawberries thanks to a donation by The Strawberry Farm on Newells Road).  We've just dropped off a few boxes of the jams to our local food bank in Ngaurawahia, which will be handed out to those in need.  What a great service they provide!

Thanks to those customers that give Sweetree honey jars back to us at the Hamilton Farmers Market!  We particularly like to give to food bank small jars to make the jam go around more people, so keep saving them up for us!
 

Find out what 'Sharing the Surplus' is all about!

 
Jam-Recipes
Jam-Pouring   Jam-Jars

 
Topics: , Sharing the Surplus
 

World Wildlife Day

Written by Stephanie on March 3rd, 2019.      0 comments

Today is World Wildlife Day and this years theme is “Life below water: for people and planet".

The ocean contains nearly 200,000 identified species, but actual numbers may be in the millions. Globally, the market value of marine and coastal resources and industries is estimated at US$3 trillion per year, about 5% of global GDP. Over three billion people depend on marine and coastal biodiversity for their livelihoods. Marine wildlife has sustained human civilization and development for millennia, from providing food and nourishment, to material for handicraft and construction. It has also enriched our lives culturally, spiritually, and recreationally in different ways.

The capacity of life below water to provide these services is severely impacted, as our planet’s oceans and the species that live within it are under assault from an onslaught of threats. As much as 40% of the ocean is now heavily affected by the most significant and direct threat of over exploitation of marine species as well as other threats such as pollution, loss of coastal habitats and climate change. These threats have a strong impact on the lives and livelihoods of those who depend on marine ecosystem services, particularly women and men in coastal communities.

This is the first World Wildlife Day to focus on life below water. It is a great opportunity to raise awareness about the breathtaking diversity of marine life, the crucial importance of marine species to human development, and how we can make sure it will continue to provide these services for future generations.

This coincides nicely with NZ Seaweek, find out what's happening in New Zealand this week to help us connect with beautiful oceans.
 

Find out more about World Wildlife Day

 
World-WildLife-Day



Social media kit - https://www.wildlifeday.org/sites/default/files/PDF/WWD2019_social_media_kit_01.pdf
Topics: , Enviromental
 

This Week is Sea Week: 2-10 March

Written by Stephanie on March 1st, 2019.      0 comments

Seaseaweek smallweek is New Zealand’s annual national week for the sea and focuses on learning from the sea.  It’s about exciting and inspiring all New Zealanders to renew their connections with the sea! It's not just for children, it's a great time for all of us to get to know our ocean, its habitats, characteristics and inhabitants better.  This years theme is 'Care for Our Seas'.

Let's head to the beach sometime over this week and enjoy our wonderful NZ coastlines.  Get in the water, walk on the beach, look out for different wildlife, take a rubbish sack and pick up rubbish.  Why not  grab a NZ sealife guide out of the library and take the kids to the rock pools for a fosick around!

 There will be a wide range of events, activities, opportunities and competitions around the country.  

Check out what's happening in your area this Seaweek



 

Topics: , Enviromental
 
ab.jpg

Read our blog to see what’s happening

Read our blog to keep up to date with what we are up to!
Find out more
ab.jpg

What do our customers say?

"This honey so delicious!  It taste just like when I was a kid, rather than the supermarket brands"  Anna Bradford, Rotorua
Read more customer feedback